Everkem /link> Tue, 22 Dec 2020 21:28:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 /?v=5.0.11 Everkem Announces Move to New Facility to Support Our Continued Growth /everkem_new_facility_announcement/ Wed, 18 Mar 2020 15:06:47 +0000 /?p=6980 [et_pb_section fb_built="1" _builder_version="3.19.5" custom_padding="0|0px|0|0px|false|false"][et_pb_row _builder_version="3.19.5"][et_pb_column type="4_4" _builder_version="3.19.5" parallax="off" parallax_method="on"][et_pb_image src="/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/NewFacility_Small.jpg" align="center" _builder_version="3.19.5" custom_margin="0px||"][/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section fb_built="1" _builder_version="3.0.47" custom_padding="0|0px|54px|0px|false|false"][et_pb_row custom_padding="0|0px|2px|0px|false|false" _builder_version="3.0.48" background_size="initial" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat"][et_pb_column type="4_4" _builder_version="3.0.47" parallax="off" parallax_method="on"][et_pb_image _builder_version="3.19.5"][/et_pb_image][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.19.5"]

Everkem is excited to announce a major move to a larger facility in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. We will be moving from our current location at 5180 Indiana Avenue to 120 Regent Drive. The new facility is approximately 48,000 square feet, roughly twice the size of our current facility with notable increases in manufacturing, shipping, and laboratory square footage. The new location will provide us with much-needed space to accommodate our rapid and continual growth.

"We're all very excited about the move to a larger facility," said Jason Lynch, President. "We've been growing at a high rate year over year, and we're bursting at the seams at our current location. The extra space has allowed us to purchase several new pieces of machinery that we simply didn't have the space for before, which will improve our operational efficiency, consistency, and quality. The larger office space also means we have room to hire additional talent across all departments."

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Everkem began as Flame Tech, Inc. operating out of a small warehouse space in Greensboro, North Carolina in 2000. By 2004, we had consolidated under the Everkem brand and moved locations to the current facility in Winston-Salem.

Through a combination of innovative and flexible manufacturing capabilities, progressive product solutions, and a customer focused view of business, we continued to grow at a consistent pace through all manner of economic conditions.

As we continued to grow, space quickly began to become an issue. We needed to hold more inventory in order to meet our shipping targets, we needed more machinery to improve efficiencies and quality, and we needed more manpower - all of which required space and facilitated the move to the new facility.

 

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="1_2" _builder_version="3.19.5" parallax="off" parallax_method="on"][et_pb_image src="/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/EverkemWSFacility_2013.jpg" alt="Everkem Diversified Products' 120 Regent Drive, Winston-Salem NC location" title_text="Everkem's 120 Regent Drive Location" show_bottom_space="off" align="center" _builder_version="3.19.5"][/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row custom_padding="0|0px|27px|0px|false|false" _builder_version="3.19.5"][et_pb_column type="4_4" _builder_version="3.19.5" parallax="off" parallax_method="on"][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.19.5"]

The relocation is planned to take place beginning March 16th, 2020 and is estimated to take three to five weeks to complete before Everkem is operating fully out of the facility. During this time, normal operations including manufacturing and shipping will continue. Customers and vendors will be notified throughout the process to make the transition as seamless as possible.

"This is an important milestone for us," Jason continued. "It's validating. It shows that the way we do business - being flexible, seeing our customers as partners, and putting people before profits really resonates with our customers. And its our customers, members of our Everkem team, who really get the credit for helping our growth."

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Everkem is excited to announce a major move to a larger facility in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. We will be moving from our current location at 5180 Indiana Avenue to 120 Regent Drive. The new facility is approximately 48,000 square feet, roughly twice the size of our current facility with notable increases in manufacturing, shipping, and laboratory square footage. The new location will provide us with much-needed space to accommodate our rapid and continual growth.

“We’re all very excited about the move to a larger facility,” said Jason Lynch, President. “We’ve been growing at a high rate year over year, and we’re bursting at the seams at our current location. The extra space has allowed us to purchase several new pieces of machinery that we simply didn’t have the space for before, which will improve our operational efficiency, consistency, and quality. The larger office space also means we have room to hire additional talent across all departments.”

Everkem began as Flame Tech, Inc. operating out of a small warehouse space in Greensboro, North Carolina in 2000. By 2004, we had consolidated under the Everkem brand and moved locations to the current facility in Winston-Salem.

Through a combination of innovative and flexible manufacturing capabilities, progressive product solutions, and a customer focused view of business, we continued to grow at a consistent pace through all manner of economic conditions.

As we continued to grow, space quickly began to become an issue. We needed to hold more inventory in order to meet our shipping targets, we needed more machinery to improve efficiencies and quality, and we needed more manpower – all of which required space and facilitated the move to the new facility.

 

Everkem Diversified Products' 120 Regent Drive, Winston-Salem NC location

The relocation is planned to take place beginning March 16th, 2020 and is estimated to take three to five weeks to complete before Everkem is operating fully out of the facility. During this time, normal operations including manufacturing and shipping will continue. Customers and vendors will be notified throughout the process to make the transition as seamless as possible.

“This is an important milestone for us,” Jason continued. “It’s validating. It shows that the way we do business – being flexible, seeing our customers as partners, and putting people before profits really resonates with our customers. And its our customers, members of our Everkem team, who really get the credit for helping our growth.”

The post Everkem Announces Move to New Facility to Support Our Continued Growth appeared first on .

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Show Us Your Caulk – Everkem Photo Contest /show-us-your-caulk-everkem-photo-contest/ Wed, 27 Mar 2019 15:10:12 +0000 /?p=6293 [et_pb_section fb_built="1" _builder_version="3.0.47" custom_padding="0|0px|0|0px|false|false"][et_pb_row custom_padding="0px|0px|0|0px|false|false" custom_margin="-75px||0px" padding_left_1="0px" _builder_version="3.19.5" background_size="initial" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat"][et_pb_column type="4_4" _builder_version="3.0.47" padding_left="0px" parallax="off" parallax_method="on"][et_pb_image src="/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/ShowUsBanner_Web2.jpg" align="center" admin_label="Banner Image" _builder_version="3.19.5" custom_margin="||-17px"][/et_pb_image][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.19.5"][/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.19.5"]

One of our favorite things is seeing our caulk in the rugged and capable hands of true professionals, meeting the demands of the toughest jobs out there. We love seeing our products in action so much, that we're calling on all caulkologists to SHOW US YOUR CAULK in our photo contest!

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row custom_padding="15px|0px|0|0px|false|false" custom_margin="0px||" _builder_version="3.19.5" background_size="initial" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" custom_margin_last_edited="on|phone"][et_pb_column type="1_2" _builder_version="3.0.47" parallax="off" parallax_method="on"][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.19.5" text_font="||||||||" text_orientation="justified"]

Send us your best photos that show our products in action. Whether you're using SilTex 40 in your bathroom, Sound Seal 90 in an apartment complex, or Firestop-814+ in a restaurant - we want to see it. The best photos will receive a $25 Visa gift card, and the most outstanding photo will win a YETI® Tundra 35 cooler.

The photo contest is rolling throughout the year with a deadline of November 30, 2019. That means we'll be judging photos and awarding the $25 Visa gift card as we receive them - and the number of winners is limited only by the quantity and quality of photos! The grand prize, however, will be awarded at the end of the contest to the best overall submission.

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="1_2" _builder_version="3.0.47" parallax="off" parallax_method="on"][et_pb_image src="/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/Yeti-Tundra_Web2.png" show_bottom_space="off" align="center" _builder_version="3.19.5" max_width="97%" max_width_tablet="60%" max_width_phone="75%" max_width_last_edited="on|phone" module_alignment="center" custom_margin="9px||0px||false" custom_margin_tablet="0px||" custom_margin_last_edited="on|desktop" custom_padding="0px||0px"][/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row custom_padding="32px|0px|0|0px|false|false" _builder_version="3.19.5"][et_pb_column type="4_4" _builder_version="3.0.47" parallax="off" parallax_method="on"][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.19.5" text_font="||||||||" header_font="Play|700||on|||||" header_text_color="#07476f" header_font_size="23px"]

How It Works:

Entering the photo contest is easy. Snap a photo of an Everkem branded product in use, and send it to us using this form. You can also send it in an email. Entries must be submitted by 11:59 pm EST on November 30th, 2019. Full entry guidelines are below:

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row custom_padding="30px|0px|0|0px|false|false" _builder_version="3.19.5"][et_pb_column type="1_2" _builder_version="3.0.47" parallax="off" parallax_method="on"][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.19.5" text_font="||||||||" header_font="Play|700||on|||||" header_text_color="#07476f" header_font_size="23px"]

Photo Requirements

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.19.5" text_font="||||||||" header_font="Play|700||on|||||" header_text_color="#07476f" header_font_size="23px"][/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.19.5" custom_margin="-10px||0px" custom_padding="|||20px"]

  • There's no limit to the number of photos one user can submit, but we do recommend narrowing down your submissions to send only the best.
  • All photos must be original, authentic content - no stock photography or studio shots. We want to see our products used by real professionals in real applications!
  • Photo must showcase our products in use, with product clearly visible or easily identifiable.
  • All photos must be unedited. If we decide to use your images, we'll take care of all the fine-tuning.
  • Entries must be in JPEG or TIFF format, must not exceed 10 megabytes in size, and be at least 1,600 pixels on the shortest side.
  • Higher quality/resolution images are strongly preferred.
  • Images should be named to include the first and last name of the entrant, as well as the product name and an indicator of the application. Ex: JDoe_TruSil100_Tub1

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="1_2" _builder_version="3.0.47" parallax="off" parallax_method="on"][et_pb_image src="/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/EvoSealMS_WildlifeControl.jpg" show_bottom_space="off" align="center" _builder_version="3.19.5" custom_margin="19px||"][/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row custom_padding="50px|0px|21px|0px|false|false" custom_margin="0px||" module_id="photo-form-anchor" _builder_version="3.19.5"][et_pb_column type="4_4" _builder_version="3.0.47" parallax="off" parallax_method="on"][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.19.5" custom_margin="-10px||" custom_padding="|||20px"][/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.19.5" text_font="||||||||" header_font="Play|700||on|||||" header_text_color="#07476f" header_font_size="23px" custom_margin="-20px||"]

How To Enter - Online Form

To enter, you can fill out the form below.

[contact-form-7 id="6328" title="Photo Contest"]

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.19.5" text_font="||||||||" custom_margin="-10px||" custom_padding="0px|||20px"][/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.19.5" text_font="||||||||" header_font="Play|700||on|||||" header_text_color="#07476f" header_font_size="23px" custom_margin="-20px||"][/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row custom_padding="50px|0px|21px|0px|false|false" custom_margin="0px||" module_id="email-photo-submission" _builder_version="3.19.5"][et_pb_column type="4_4" _builder_version="3.0.47" parallax="off" parallax_method="on"][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.19.5" custom_margin="-10px||" custom_padding="|||20px"][/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.19.5" text_font="||||||||" header_font="Play|700||on|||||" header_text_color="#07476f" header_font_size="23px" custom_margin="-20px||"]

How To Enter - Via Email

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  • Submit your image by emailing it to marketing@everkemproducts.com.
  • Use subject line Everkem Photo Contest or similar.
  • Include full contact information within the body of the email - name, business name, address, and phone numbers.
  • Entries must be received by 11:59 pm EST on November 30th, 2019.

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.19.5" text_font="||||||||" header_font="Play|700||on|||||" header_text_color="#07476f" header_font_size="23px" custom_margin="-20px||"]

Judging And Prizes

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row custom_padding="0|0px|27px|0px|false|false" _builder_version="3.19.5"][et_pb_column type="4_4" _builder_version="3.0.47" parallax="off" parallax_method="on"][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.19.5" text_font="||||||||" custom_margin="-10px||" custom_padding="|||20px"]

  • Submissions will be judged by a panel based on overall image quality, originality, authenticity, and product visibility.
  • There will be two rounds of judging. The first round of judging will be done on a rolling basis, as entries are submitted. Submissions moving on to the final round of judging will receive a $25 Visa gift card.
  • After submissions end on November 30th, 2019, final judging to determine the best overall photo will occur on December 10th, 2019. 
  • The entry selected as the best photo overall will receive the grand prize of a Yeti Tundra 35 cooler.

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 We're excited to see where and how caulkologists are using our products. So get those cameras ready, and SHOW US YOUR CAULK!

 

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_divider color="#b7b7b7" divider_weight="1px" _builder_version="3.19.5" max_width="80%" module_alignment="center"][/et_pb_divider][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.19.5" text_font="||||||||" text_font_size="11px" text_orientation="justified" custom_margin="-10px||" custom_padding="0px||"]

CONSENT: By submitting your photo you are granting consent to Everkem Diversified Products' usage of the photo for advertising and marketing purposes. Everkem reserves the right to use any photo or video submitted without the express written permission of those in the photo or video. Everkem Diversified Products may use the photo or video in publications or other media material, in any medium produced, used, or contracted by Everkem Diversified Products including but not limited to: brochures, magazines, flyers, and digital collateral. ELIGIBILITY AND FORMAT: Entry open to  all U.S. residents 18 years of age or older. No purchase necessary. Void where prohibited. Photos must be original content. Photos or videos must be emailed to marketing@everkemproducts.com with the subject line 'Everkem Photo Contest' or similar. Images must be labeled with entrant's name, date, and product name; and submission must include name, address, and phone number in body of submission email. Submitted media must show product in use with product name clearly visible. All entries should be in JPEG or TIFF format, not to exceed 10 megabytes, and be at least 1,600 pixels on the shortest side. Images must be unedited. DEADLINE, JUDGING, AND PRIZES: Contest entries accepted until 11/30/2019, 11:59 pm EST. All entries will be judged by a panel based on image quality and usability for marketing purposes, product visibility, and authenticity. $25 prize winners will be selected on a rolling basis throughout contest duration. Grand prize winner of Yeti® Tundra Cooler will be chosen on 12/10/2019. Winners will be notified via email. Everkem Diversified Products is not affiliated with Yeti or its subsidiaries. CONTACT: Everkem Diversified Products / 120 Regent Drive / Winston-Salem, NC 27103 / 1-800-638-3160.

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One of our favorite things is seeing our caulk in the rugged and capable hands of true professionals, meeting the demands of the toughest jobs out there. We love seeing our products in action so much, that we’re calling on all caulkologists to SHOW US YOUR CAULK in our photo contest!

Send us your best photos that show our products in action. Whether you’re using SilTex 40 in your bathroom, Sound Seal 90 in an apartment complex, or Firestop-814+ in a restaurant – we want to see it. The best photos will receive a $25 Visa gift card, and the most outstanding photo will win a YETI® Tundra 35 cooler.

The photo contest is rolling throughout the year with a deadline of November 30, 2019. That means we’ll be judging photos and awarding the $25 Visa gift card as we receive them – and the number of winners is limited only by the quantity and quality of photos! The grand prize, however, will be awarded at the end of the contest to the best overall submission.

How It Works:

Entering the photo contest is easy. Snap a photo of an Everkem branded product in use, and send it to us using this form. You can also send it in an email. Entries must be submitted by 11:59 pm EST on November 30th, 2019. Full entry guidelines are below:

Photo Requirements

  • There’s no limit to the number of photos one user can submit, but we do recommend narrowing down your submissions to send only the best.
  • All photos must be original, authentic content – no stock photography or studio shots. We want to see our products used by real professionals in real applications!
  • Photo must showcase our products in use, with product clearly visible or easily identifiable.
  • All photos must be unedited. If we decide to use your images, we’ll take care of all the fine-tuning.
  • Entries must be in JPEG or TIFF format, must not exceed 10 megabytes in size, and be at least 1,600 pixels on the shortest side.
  • Higher quality/resolution images are strongly preferred.
  • Images should be named to include the first and last name of the entrant, as well as the product name and an indicator of the application. Ex: JDoe_TruSil100_Tub1

How To Enter – Online Form

To enter, you can fill out the form below.

[contact-form-7]

How To Enter – Via Email

  • Submit your image by emailing it to marketing@everkemproducts.com.
  • Use subject line Everkem Photo Contest or similar.
  • Include full contact information within the body of the email – name, business name, address, and phone numbers.
  • Entries must be received by 11:59 pm EST on November 30th, 2019.

Judging And Prizes

  • Submissions will be judged by a panel based on overall image quality, originality, authenticity, and product visibility.
  • There will be two rounds of judging. The first round of judging will be done on a rolling basis, as entries are submitted. Submissions moving on to the final round of judging will receive a $25 Visa gift card.
  • After submissions end on November 30th, 2019, final judging to determine the best overall photo will occur on December 10th, 2019. 
  • The entry selected as the best photo overall will receive the grand prize of a Yeti Tundra 35 cooler.

 We’re excited to see where and how caulkologists are using our products. So get those cameras ready, and SHOW US YOUR CAULK!

 

CONSENT: By submitting your photo you are granting consent to Everkem Diversified Products’ usage of the photo for advertising and marketing purposes. Everkem reserves the right to use any photo or video submitted without the express written permission of those in the photo or video. Everkem Diversified Products may use the photo or video in publications or other media material, in any medium produced, used, or contracted by Everkem Diversified Products including but not limited to: brochures, magazines, flyers, and digital collateral. ELIGIBILITY AND FORMAT: Entry open to  all U.S. residents 18 years of age or older. No purchase necessary. Void where prohibited. Photos must be original content. Photos or videos must be emailed to marketing@everkemproducts.com with the subject line ‘Everkem Photo Contest’ or similar. Images must be labeled with entrant’s name, date, and product name; and submission must include name, address, and phone number in body of submission email. Submitted media must show product in use with product name clearly visible. All entries should be in JPEG or TIFF format, not to exceed 10 megabytes, and be at least 1,600 pixels on the shortest side. Images must be unedited. DEADLINE, JUDGING, AND PRIZES: Contest entries accepted until 11/30/2019, 11:59 pm EST. All entries will be judged by a panel based on image quality and usability for marketing purposes, product visibility, and authenticity. $25 prize winners will be selected on a rolling basis throughout contest duration. Grand prize winner of Yeti® Tundra Cooler will be chosen on 12/10/2019. Winners will be notified via email. Everkem Diversified Products is not affiliated with Yeti or its subsidiaries. CONTACT: Everkem Diversified Products / 120 Regent Drive / Winston-Salem, NC 27103 / 1-800-638-3160.

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]]> TruSil100 Silicone Sealant Meets LEED v4 Emission Requirements /5761-2/ Mon, 29 Jan 2018 19:18:12 +0000 /?p=5761 In a previous entry we announced that our FS814 and SS90 products were tested for emissions and were confirmed to be LEED v4 compliant per CA Section 01350. Today, we’re happy to announce that our NSF Rated, 100% Silicone Sealant, TruSil 100 has been tested and is LEED v4 compliant as well. You can view the testing documentation here.

As mentioned in our previous entry regarding our FS814+ and SS90 products, Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC’s) are some nasty air pollutants emitted as gases from certain solids or liquids that are often times found in many building materials. These pollutants can cause a host of long-term adverse health effects, and so minimizing them is of the utmost import. TruSil 100’s LEED v4 compliance gives architects, specifiers, installers, and inhabitants confidence that the product positively impacts the built environment while simultaneously contributing points toward the LEED rating system.

TruSil 100 offers increased performance over lesser ‘extended’ silicone formulations due to its 100% silicone formulation. It also carries an NSF certification, ensuring the product is food safe approved for applications in and around food processing, storage or any application where food contact may occur. These key features, combined with applications in green-building projects thanks to the LEED v4 compliance makes TruSil 100 the superior silicone solution for more application and construction types than ever before.

Click to learn more about our TruSil 100, or visit our Spec Center for technical documentation on all of our products.

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In a previous entry we announced that our FS814 and SS90 products were tested for emissions and were confirmed to be LEED v4 compliant per CA Section 01350. Today, we’re happy to announce that our NSF Rated, 100% Silicone Sealant, TruSil 100 has been tested and is LEED v4 compliant as well. You can view the testing documentation here.

As mentioned in our previous entry regarding our FS814+ and SS90 products, Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC’s) are some nasty air pollutants emitted as gases from certain solids or liquids that are often times found in many building materials. These pollutants can cause a host of long-term adverse health effects, and so minimizing them is of the utmost import. TruSil 100’s LEED v4 compliance gives architects, specifiers, installers, and inhabitants confidence that the product positively impacts the built environment while simultaneously contributing points toward the LEED rating system.

TruSil 100 offers increased performance over lesser ‘extended’ silicone formulations due to its 100% silicone formulation. It also carries an NSF certification, ensuring the product is food safe approved for applications in and around food processing, storage or any application where food contact may occur. These key features, combined with applications in green-building projects thanks to the LEED v4 compliance makes TruSil 100 the superior silicone solution for more application and construction types than ever before.

Click to learn more about our TruSil 100, or visit our Spec Center for technical documentation on all of our products.

The post TruSil100 Silicone Sealant Meets LEED v4 Emission Requirements appeared first on .

]]> Caulks and Sealants in Wildlife Control /caulks-sealants-wildlife-control/ Wed, 03 Jan 2018 17:29:18 +0000 /?p=5712 With the cold weather of winter setting in, humans aren't the only creatures seeking to keep warm. All sorts of critters from mice to raccoons, opossums to foxes are looking for shelter and places to stay warm. Often times, their search for shelter can bring them into our homes where they enjoy dwelling in places such as attics, basements, crawlspaces, walls, garages, sheds, workshops, and other similar areas.

Sealing against the encroachment of these pests is just as important as sealing to protect our homes from unwanted air transmission, moisture, and mold. To discuss the importance of animal exclusion and how caulks and sealants like our EvoSeal MS and Full Fill General Purpose foam sealant play an important role in the process, we sat down with Jacob Barnes of Dayton, Ohio, owner of Barnes Wildlife Control.

In business for 7 years, Barnes Wildlife Control provides animal pest control, exclusion, and removal services to the greater Dayton, Ohio area. While specializing in bat removal services, they've handled a wide array of critter and insect issues including literal bats in the belfry (having removed large bat colonies from church bell towers) to the removal of window-trapped raccoons in the wee hours of the night, and nearly everything in between.

According to Jacob, most people think animal removal and exclusion services are only necessary when the weather turns cold. "That's just not the case," he explained. "Different animal pests have different breeding seasons and habitats; homeowners experience year round pest problems. In the late summer and early fall, we see hundreds of bat cases, and by early winter our work has transitioned over to keeping rodents such as mice out of homes - roughly 90% of our work in the month of December is getting rodent problems resolved for homeowners (in the Miami Valley, Ohio area)."

As such, homeowners should make an 'animal exclusion' checklist as they prepare their homes for seasonal changes. Exclusion techniques may include sealing entry points, placing sscreens over vents and other openings, or establishing other barriers to intrusion from wildlife.

Due to the range of animal natures, habits, and levels of intelligence, some preventative measures may be more effective than others. Improperly implemented techniques can do more harm than good by creating easily avoidable situations the animal can adapt their behavior to circumvent. As such, it is always best to consult a wildlife control specialist like Barnes Wildlife Control when seeking to properly implement animal intrusion prevention techniques.

In the event an unwanted animal guest finds their way into your home or other property structure, Jacob recommends quick action. "You never want to procrastinate when it comes to animals living in your attic, or any other space. The longer animals are living in your home, the higher the risk for zoonotic disease transfer (diseases that are spread from animals to human beings; typically caused by viruses, bacteria, parasites, or fungi and includes such diseases as Bird Flu, Ebola, Hepatitis E, Lyme Disease, and more)."

In addition to an increased risk of disease transferrence, Barnes also stresses that the unchecked presence of animals in your home can lead to substantial damages. Early detection and removal can limit removal and repair costs, but if left unresolved and allowed to grow over time, the cost can reach over $10,000.

"But even the best wildlife exclusion techniques, performed by the best and most experienced teams rely on quality products," Jacob added. "If the materials we use fail to keep varmints out of your home, then the animal eviction fails as well."

This is especially true for caulks and sealants that are commonly used to seal up small gaps that rodents and other insects and animals can squeeze their way into. Any sealant has to meet a long list of requirements in order to do the job properly, Jacob explained.

[caption id="attachment_5715" align="alignright" width="286"]EvoSeal MS, Animal Control Sealant, Wildlife Control Sealant The Barnes Wildlife Control team makes use of EvoSeal MS's cold-weather application to seal against the unwanted intrusion of animal pests, even in less than ideal conditions.[/caption]

A sealant needs to have great adhesion. If not, then an animal can gnaw, scratch, and pull the bead away from the joint or seam and gain entry. It also needs to be compatible with a wide array of substrates, as homes and their spaces (like attics and basements) and other structures on a homeowner's property (like sheds or workshops) can include a host of different materials in their construction. Flexibility is also important. If the product isn't flexible enough, then it won't be able to 'move' with the structure as it expands and contracts due to seasonal temperature and humidity changes. This can result in the sealant tearing or peeling away from the substrate. A sealant's ability to stand up to the elements is essential, since many applications wildlife control specialists, like Barnes' team, face are external.

"We use EvoSeal MS for our sealing applications. Not only does it meet and exceed our needs in terms of adhesion, substrate compatibility, flexibility, and durability - it has the unique added bonus of being able to be applied in cold temperatures, and to wet surfaces. We perform our services year round, be it warm or cold. When a client has an unwanted animal visitor, they want it out and any points of re-entry sealed up ASAP. They're not too keen on waiting until its sunny, dry, and 60 degrees out."

Wildlife control is a subject many homeowner's don't think about (until they get an opossum in their attic), but one that is instrumental to ensuring preservation of property and personal safety. As a manufacturer of caulks, sealants, and firestopping products, we're proud to offer quality, performance focused solutions like our EvoSeal MS and Full Fill foam that help wildlife control companies, like Barnes Wildlife Control, protect people, property, and wildlife.

Contact us today for more information on our EvoSeal MS, or any of our caulks, sealants, or adhesives.

The Barnes Wildlife Control team has a combined 100 years of animal removal experience and the entire crew is certified and knowledgeable on animal damage repairs and how to keep them from combing back. They offer many services including: Wildlife removal, insect pest control, dead animal and deer carcass removal, habitat modification and tree trimming, animal damage repair, attic restoration and insulation services, and more. Contact them today to get your home animal-proofed, and for any animal removal requirements.

The post Caulks and Sealants in Wildlife Control appeared first on .

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With the cold weather of winter setting in, humans aren’t the only creatures seeking to keep warm. All sorts of critters from mice to raccoons, opossums to foxes are looking for shelter and places to stay warm. Often times, their search for shelter can bring them into our homes where they enjoy dwelling in places such as attics, basements, crawlspaces, walls, garages, sheds, workshops, and other similar areas.

Sealing against the encroachment of these pests is just as important as sealing to protect our homes from unwanted air transmission, moisture, and mold. To discuss the importance of animal exclusion and how caulks and sealants like our EvoSeal MS and Full Fill General Purpose foam sealant play an important role in the process, we sat down with Jacob Barnes of Dayton, Ohio, owner of Barnes Wildlife Control.

In business for 7 years, Barnes Wildlife Control provides animal pest control, exclusion, and removal services to the greater Dayton, Ohio area. While specializing in bat removal services, they’ve handled a wide array of critter and insect issues including literal bats in the belfry (having removed large bat colonies from church bell towers) to the removal of window-trapped raccoons in the wee hours of the night, and nearly everything in between.

According to Jacob, most people think animal removal and exclusion services are only necessary when the weather turns cold. “That’s just not the case,” he explained. “Different animal pests have different breeding seasons and habitats; homeowners experience year round pest problems. In the late summer and early fall, we see hundreds of bat cases, and by early winter our work has transitioned over to keeping rodents such as mice out of homes – roughly 90% of our work in the month of December is getting rodent problems resolved for homeowners (in the Miami Valley, Ohio area).”

As such, homeowners should make an ‘animal exclusion’ checklist as they prepare their homes for seasonal changes. Exclusion techniques may include sealing entry points, placing sscreens over vents and other openings, or establishing other barriers to intrusion from wildlife.

Due to the range of animal natures, habits, and levels of intelligence, some preventative measures may be more effective than others. Improperly implemented techniques can do more harm than good by creating easily avoidable situations the animal can adapt their behavior to circumvent. As such, it is always best to consult a wildlife control specialist like Barnes Wildlife Control when seeking to properly implement animal intrusion prevention techniques.

In the event an unwanted animal guest finds their way into your home or other property structure, Jacob recommends quick action. “You never want to procrastinate when it comes to animals living in your attic, or any other space. The longer animals are living in your home, the higher the risk for zoonotic disease transfer (diseases that are spread from animals to human beings; typically caused by viruses, bacteria, parasites, or fungi and includes such diseases as Bird Flu, Ebola, Hepatitis E, Lyme Disease, and more).”

In addition to an increased risk of disease transferrence, Barnes also stresses that the unchecked presence of animals in your home can lead to substantial damages. Early detection and removal can limit removal and repair costs, but if left unresolved and allowed to grow over time, the cost can reach over $10,000.

“But even the best wildlife exclusion techniques, performed by the best and most experienced teams rely on quality products,” Jacob added. “If the materials we use fail to keep varmints out of your home, then the animal eviction fails as well.”

This is especially true for caulks and sealants that are commonly used to seal up small gaps that rodents and other insects and animals can squeeze their way into. Any sealant has to meet a long list of requirements in order to do the job properly, Jacob explained.

EvoSeal MS, Animal Control Sealant, Wildlife Control Sealant

The Barnes Wildlife Control team makes use of EvoSeal MS’s cold-weather application to seal against the unwanted intrusion of animal pests, even in less than ideal conditions.

A sealant needs to have great adhesion. If not, then an animal can gnaw, scratch, and pull the bead away from the joint or seam and gain entry. It also needs to be compatible with a wide array of substrates, as homes and their spaces (like attics and basements) and other structures on a homeowner’s property (like sheds or workshops) can include a host of different materials in their construction. Flexibility is also important. If the product isn’t flexible enough, then it won’t be able to ‘move’ with the structure as it expands and contracts due to seasonal temperature and humidity changes. This can result in the sealant tearing or peeling away from the substrate. A sealant’s ability to stand up to the elements is essential, since many applications wildlife control specialists, like Barnes’ team, face are external.

“We use EvoSeal MS for our sealing applications. Not only does it meet and exceed our needs in terms of adhesion, substrate compatibility, flexibility, and durability – it has the unique added bonus of being able to be applied in cold temperatures, and to wet surfaces. We perform our services year round, be it warm or cold. When a client has an unwanted animal visitor, they want it out and any points of re-entry sealed up ASAP. They’re not too keen on waiting until its sunny, dry, and 60 degrees out.”

Wildlife control is a subject many homeowner’s don’t think about (until they get an opossum in their attic), but one that is instrumental to ensuring preservation of property and personal safety. As a manufacturer of caulks, sealants, and firestopping products, we’re proud to offer quality, performance focused solutions like our EvoSeal MS and Full Fill foam that help wildlife control companies, like Barnes Wildlife Control, protect people, property, and wildlife.

Contact us today for more information on our EvoSeal MS, or any of our caulks, sealants, or adhesives.

The Barnes Wildlife Control team has a combined 100 years of animal removal experience and the entire crew is certified and knowledgeable on animal damage repairs and how to keep them from combing back. They offer many services including: Wildlife removal, insect pest control, dead animal and deer carcass removal, habitat modification and tree trimming, animal damage repair, attic restoration and insulation services, and more. Contact them today to get your home animal-proofed, and for any animal removal requirements.

The post Caulks and Sealants in Wildlife Control appeared first on .

]]> Firestop-814+ and Sound Seal 90 Meet LEED v4 Emission Requirements /firestop-814-sound-seal-90-leed-v4-emission-requirements/ Wed, 27 Dec 2017 19:24:25 +0000 /?p=5701 Everkem is devoted to improving the quality of live within the built environment through our sealants, adhesives, and firestopping products. Each of these product categories play vital roles in energy conservation, as safeguards from air and noise pollution, the preservation of physical property, and most importantly - the protection of human health and well-being.

To that end, we are pleased to announce that our Firestop-814+ Firestopping Sealant and Sound Seal 90 Draft, Smoke, and Acoustical Sound Sealant have been UL tested for emissivity and are LEED v4 compliant sealants as 'low emission interior sealants and adhesives applied on site' per testing to CA Section 01350.

You can view the documentation of this LEED v4 compliance testing for our Firestop-814+ here, and our Sound Seal 90 here.

 

What is LEED v4?

The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) program was created by the US Green Building Council (USGBC) and the Department of Energy (DOE) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1997 and was later formalized by the USGBC.

LEED was established as a rating system to evaluate the environmental performance of a building as well as helping to promote a market shift towards a more sustainable design. Today, LEED is the most widely used green building system in the world and covers nearly all building project types. The credit based system creates a framework wherein project teams create healthy, efficient, and cost-effective buildings by earning points for satisfying specific 'green' building criteria during the construction and designed use of a building.

The LEED rating system has seen multiple revisions, with the most recent iteration being LEED v4. While being launched in 2013, projects were able to be registered under the previous version's (LEED 2009) rating system until last year. This latest version, according to USGBC, aims to be "more specialized and designed for a better user experience". Additionally, LEED v4 contains more stringent criteria while requiring product validation by approved third party testing.

 

LEED v4 and VOC Emissions

One of the components of the LEED rating system is minimization of a major class of indoor pollutants known as Volatile OrganiC Compounds (VOCs), found within the built environment. VOCs are a class of pollutants emitted as gases from certain solids or liquids. VOCs can be emitted into indoor air from a wide array of sources such as flooring, composite wood products, paint, paint strippers and other solvents, sealants and adhesives, and other building materials.

Many VOCs can have short- and long-term adverse health effects including: Eye, nose, and throat irritation; headache, loss of coordination, and nausea; damage to liver, kidneys, and the central nervous system; and even cancer.

Studies have shown that VOC levels are typically much higher (up to ten times!) indoors than outdoors, regardless of whether the building is located in a rural, urban, or industrial area. When considering the time we spend indoors (at work, recreation, and especially at home), it becomes apparent that minimizing exposure to volatile organic compounds is essential not only for our comfort, but our health and safety.

In regards to certain VOC emitting materials, previous LEED versions have treated them as 5 separate issues, each worth 1 point. In LEED v4, these categories (plus an additional one) have been condensed into one credit called "Low Emitting Materials", worth a total of up to 3 points. Also in previous versions, LEED set out VOC guidelines (using those set by California regulations or GreenSeal standards) and the grams per liter of VOCs in each product used on a LEED certified project were compared to these limits to determine compliance.

In LEED v4, the VOC compliance guideline still remains, but an additional layer of certification is required. VOC compliance alone is no longer enough. Instead, LEED v4 has bolstered the requirements by mandating emissions testing by a certified, third party laboratory to ensure the product is in compliance with the California Department of Public Health's "Standard Method for the Testing and Evaluation of Volatile Organic Chemical Emissions from Indoor Sources using Environmental Chambers" v1.2 (Emission testing method for CA Specification 01350).

There are a host of other changes in LEED that affect nearly all building materials and types of construction - not just sealants and adhesives. A full list of differences can be obtained from the resource area of the USGBC's website.

The concept of green building is the realization that the built environment can have huge effects, both positive and negative, on the natural environment as well as the individuals who occupy buildings ever day. Beyond this realization, it is about action to maximize the positive while minimizing the negative of these effect throughout the life cycle of the building, from planning to daily operation.

In understanding that our caulks, sealants, adhesives, and firestopping products are essential components in building safer and more sustainable buildings, we at Everkem realize our responsibility to provide quality, performance-driven products that impact the built and natural environments, and the people who occupy them, in a positive way.

Click to learn more about our Firestop-814+ and Sound Seal 90, or visit our Spec Center for technical documentation on all of our products.

The post Firestop-814+ and Sound Seal 90 Meet LEED v4 Emission Requirements appeared first on .

]]>

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Everkem is devoted to improving the quality of live within the built environment through our sealants, adhesives, and firestopping products. Each of these product categories play vital roles in energy conservation, as safeguards from air and noise pollution, the preservation of physical property, and most importantly – the protection of human health and well-being.

To that end, we are pleased to announce that our Firestop-814+ Firestopping Sealant and Sound Seal 90 Draft, Smoke, and Acoustical Sound Sealant have been UL tested for emissivity and are LEED v4 compliant sealants as ‘low emission interior sealants and adhesives applied on site’ per testing to CA Section 01350.

You can view the documentation of this LEED v4 compliance testing for our Firestop-814+ here, and our Sound Seal 90 here.

 

What is LEED v4?

The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) program was created by the US Green Building Council (USGBC) and the Department of Energy (DOE) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1997 and was later formalized by the USGBC.

LEED was established as a rating system to evaluate the environmental performance of a building as well as helping to promote a market shift towards a more sustainable design. Today, LEED is the most widely used green building system in the world and covers nearly all building project types. The credit based system creates a framework wherein project teams create healthy, efficient, and cost-effective buildings by earning points for satisfying specific ‘green’ building criteria during the construction and designed use of a building.

The LEED rating system has seen multiple revisions, with the most recent iteration being LEED v4. While being launched in 2013, projects were able to be registered under the previous version’s (LEED 2009) rating system until last year. This latest version, according to USGBC, aims to be “more specialized and designed for a better user experience”. Additionally, LEED v4 contains more stringent criteria while requiring product validation by approved third party testing.

 

LEED v4 and VOC Emissions

One of the components of the LEED rating system is minimization of a major class of indoor pollutants known as Volatile OrganiC Compounds (VOCs), found within the built environment. VOCs are a class of pollutants emitted as gases from certain solids or liquids. VOCs can be emitted into indoor air from a wide array of sources such as flooring, composite wood products, paint, paint strippers and other solvents, sealants and adhesives, and other building materials.

Many VOCs can have short- and long-term adverse health effects including: Eye, nose, and throat irritation; headache, loss of coordination, and nausea; damage to liver, kidneys, and the central nervous system; and even cancer.

Studies have shown that VOC levels are typically much higher (up to ten times!) indoors than outdoors, regardless of whether the building is located in a rural, urban, or industrial area. When considering the time we spend indoors (at work, recreation, and especially at home), it becomes apparent that minimizing exposure to volatile organic compounds is essential not only for our comfort, but our health and safety.

In regards to certain VOC emitting materials, previous LEED versions have treated them as 5 separate issues, each worth 1 point. In LEED v4, these categories (plus an additional one) have been condensed into one credit called “Low Emitting Materials”, worth a total of up to 3 points. Also in previous versions, LEED set out VOC guidelines (using those set by California regulations or GreenSeal standards) and the grams per liter of VOCs in each product used on a LEED certified project were compared to these limits to determine compliance.

In LEED v4, the VOC compliance guideline still remains, but an additional layer of certification is required. VOC compliance alone is no longer enough. Instead, LEED v4 has bolstered the requirements by mandating emissions testing by a certified, third party laboratory to ensure the product is in compliance with the California Department of Public Health’s “Standard Method for the Testing and Evaluation of Volatile Organic Chemical Emissions from Indoor Sources using Environmental Chambers” v1.2 (Emission testing method for CA Specification 01350).

There are a host of other changes in LEED that affect nearly all building materials and types of construction – not just sealants and adhesives. A full list of differences can be obtained from the resource area of the USGBC’s website.

The concept of green building is the realization that the built environment can have huge effects, both positive and negative, on the natural environment as well as the individuals who occupy buildings ever day. Beyond this realization, it is about action to maximize the positive while minimizing the negative of these effect throughout the life cycle of the building, from planning to daily operation.

In understanding that our caulks, sealants, adhesives, and firestopping products are essential components in building safer and more sustainable buildings, we at Everkem realize our responsibility to provide quality, performance-driven products that impact the built and natural environments, and the people who occupy them, in a positive way.

Click to learn more about our Firestop-814+ and Sound Seal 90, or visit our Spec Center for technical documentation on all of our products.

The post Firestop-814+ and Sound Seal 90 Meet LEED v4 Emission Requirements appeared first on .

]]> Simplifying Sound Reduction: Flanking Noise and Acoustical Sealants /sound-reduction-flanking-noise-acoustical-sealants/ Mon, 09 Oct 2017 14:32:04 +0000 /?p=5549 In the previous entry of our series on sound, we touched on the basics of sound and the main principles of sound reduction and isolation. One of those principles was that of Conduction; more specifically, the concept of flanking pathways. This is particularly relevant due to the role it plays in sound reduction and the usage of acoustical sealants to mitigate that role. In this entry, we'll discuss the effects of flanking paths and flanking noise. Additionally, we'll explain the role an acoustical sealant like our Sound Seal 90 Smoke, Draft, and Acoustical Sealant differs from standard latex or silicone caulks and how it can help reduce flanking noise. Finally, we'll detail the proper application of the acoustical sealant to resume the sound reduction integrity of the assembly.

 

What is Flanking Noise?

In simple terms, flanking noise is the noise which reaches a room by an indirect method; by going over, under, or around barriers intended to provide sound or noise control. Sound, much like air and water will take the path of least resistance between rooms. The routes that sound takes to bypass sound reduction efforts are called flanking paths. While this facet of sound reduction is rarely talked about, it can have huge ramifications in the success of your sound reduction efforts. You may have spent a lot of time planning and money constructing a high performing partition, making sure to address the key principles we discussed in our previous entry – only to find the level of sound reduction nowhere near your desired level.

That's because no assembly can ever perform better than the level of surrounding flanking noise. In the scenario below, there is no way to improve the performance of the wall. The wall is not failing, the adjacent surfaces are. In order to ensure the sound partition is performing as it should and resulting in the desired level of sound reduction, the flanking paths of the surrounding structures must be addressed.

Diagram of flanking pathways that can reduce the sound reduction performance of a sound wall/partition Us acoustical sealants where possible to reduce impact of flanking noise.

Common flanking paths include:

  • Ceilings - Air and sound leakage around partition walls at ceilings.
  • Doors - Air and sound leakage around doors.
  • Ductwork - Shared ductwork between rooms creates a direct path for sound to travel.
  • Electrical receptacles & light switches - Air and sound leakage around unsealed electrical outlets, switches, or boxes.
  • Floor noise transmission - Floor coverings extending beneath partitions into adjoining rooms create flanking path.
  • Framing connections - Even in decoupled frame design, a solid path through a band joist or drywall panel creates a flanking path for sound.
  • Plumbing penetrations - Air and sound leaks through the penetrations as well as plumbing chaseways that pass between areas.
  • Resilient channel mistakes - Improperly placed screws that penetrate into studs or joists.
  • Partition edge abutments to adjoining walls, ceilings, and floors.

Each of these sources of flanking noise can be minimized in different ways. We'll be focusing on a few key flanking paths and how the application of acoustical sealants such as our Sound Seal 90 Draft, Smoke, and Acoustical Sealant can be used to minimize their impact.

 

Understanding Acoustical Sealants

It is important to understand that acoustical sealants aren't the same as ordinary silicone or latex caulk. The key difference to note is that acoustical sealants are formulated to remain permanently flexible. Over time, a sealant will experience expansion and contraction due to fluctuations in humidity, as well as shearing stress caused by slight movement of the built structure. Caulks that do not remain flexible can eventually crack or shrink, or separate from the substrates - both causing the seal to fail and creating a seam or gap that allows for the passage of sound. Additionally, a good quality acoustical sealants will show reduced shrinkage in comparison to standard caulks. Shrinkage of the sealant can result in the bead tearing away from one or more of the substrates, once again creating a pathway for sound to travel through. Our Sound Seal 90 experiences only 15.4% shrinkage, compared to the 20-25% exhibited my other acoustical sealants.

Furthermore, a quality acoustical joint sealant will have been tested by accredited laboratories to meet a host of standards and specifications.
ASTM-C834 for example, is a standard which classifies a latex sealant according to its flexibility based on the results of many other tests. ASTM-E90 measures the sound transmission loss of building partitions and elements. Many of these tests or certifications are required by building codes as per the ICC’s International Building Code (IBC). For example: IBC Section 120.7 states that “Walls, partitions, and floor/ceiling assemblies separating dwelling units from each other or from public or service areas shall have a sound transmission class (STC) of not less than 50 for air-borne noise when tested in accordance with ASTM-E90. Penetrations or openings in construction assemblies…shall be sealed, lined, insulated, or otherwise treated to maintain the required ratings.”

For a full list of technical documentation on our Sound Seal 90 Acoustical Joint sealant, please visit our product page.

An important understanding to have and one that many often times confuse is the relationship between an acoustical joint sealant and an STC rating. STC ratings apply to the entirety of the system itself: partitions, ceilings, floors, doors, windows, and exterior wall configurations, and not necessarily to their individual components. These assemblies are usually tested in laboratory settings in order to identify their sound reduction potential, expressed as an STC value. These environments are highly controlled, with great pains to minimize the effect of flanking noise that that the results reflect the performance of the partition itself.

In the field, however, conditions are much different. Typically, the assembly will exhibit lower performance than in laboratory conditions due to the existence of flanking noise. This noise can be present at the time of initial construction & insulation, or when the assembly is altered post-installation (one may add an additional outlet, or cut out to accommodate mounted television wires, for example).

In such cases, acoustical joint sealants are used only to resume (and in some cases improve) the sound reducing integrity of the assembly. No acoustical joint sealant inherently carries an STC rating. Any stated STC rating is simply the highest STC rated assembly that sealant has been used or tested in to resume the integrity of.

 

Using Acoustical Sealants

Typically, acoustical sealants are used in the following applications to reduce flanking noise, thus enabling the wall to achieve, maintain, and potentially improve the desired level of sound reduction:

  • Top and bottom runners prior to application of drywall
  • Outer edge perimeter joints of drywall
  • Cut-outs and utility penetrations
  • Bottom of wall, wall to wall, and head of wall joints
  • Penetrations for metallic, insulated metallic and non-metallic pipe, ducts, conduits, cables, and wires in non-fire rated smoke partitions and/or acoustical assemblies
  • In conjunction with resilient mounts (such as resilient channels or sound clips)

When applying an acoustical sealant it is critical to ensure you achieve a high quality seal. Seal quality is essential in minimizing sound transmission through these flanking pathways. Even the slightest seal failure can have huge ramifications - a gap that makes up 1% of surface area can allow 50% of the sound to pass through it.

  1. Ensure that all surfaces are cleaned of any debris or material that may prevent or deter adhesion. Common debris types include dirt, loose particulate, existing sealants, grease, etc.
  2. Load a tube of acoustical sealant into a standard quart sized caulking gun. We recommend our Sound Seal 90 Draft, Smoke, and Acoustical Sealant.
  3. Cut nozzle to allow recommended bead size. Bead size may range from 3/8" to 1/4", depending on application.
  4. Apply sealant on underside of all runners at the ceiling and floor prior to the installation of drywall, the outer edge perimeter joints, cut-outs, and utility penetrations. Apply sealant to the joint where partial drywall sheets meet window and door frames.
    • When sealing cutouts in drywall made to accommodate utility penetrations such as electrical outlets or light switches, coat the the inside perimeter of these cutouts. Boxes should be installed before sealant sets. Instead of a sealant, putty pads like our Fire-Rated Putty Pads, may be used.
    • When filling gaps larger than 1/4" around, fill with loose filler material or backer rod before applying acoustical sealant to complete the filling. Backer rod width should be roughly twice the width of the gap to be caulked.
  5. Sound Seal 90 has a tooling time of approximately 15 minutes. The sealant may be tooled using finger, putty knife, spatula, or other means. Use water or wet cloth to clean tools and excess sealant following each installation. Due to the permanent flexibility of acoustical sealants, any residual amounts may interfere with adhesion and compromise the quality of the seal or adhesion to additional products like drywall tape or other joint compounds.
  6. If using a bulk caulking gun, load sealant into gun as directed by bulk gun manufacturer or sealant manufacturer.

Diagram showing the proper placement of acoustical sealants to ensure a high quality seal against sound transmission

The above diagram shows examples of acoustical sealant placement of varying qualities in an assembly. The assembly is constructed of framing with two panels of drywall with damping compound between each layer, located on either side of the stud.

  • Poor Quality: The acoustical sealant is applied underneath the frame only. This allows sound to seep in on either side of the assembly, with only a single bead of sealant impeding its path. Additionally, the layers of drywall, even though damped, can and will still experience minute vibrations that help transfer sound.
  • Good Quality: The sealant is applied at the intersection of the framing and innermost layers of drywall. This is an improvement over the "poor" sealant placement as it seals the seam between the innermost layer of drywall and the bottom plate on both sides.
  • Very Good Quality: The sealant is applied at the intersection of the bottom plate and the innermost layers of drywall and underneath the bottom plate. This creates a seal on either side of the frame, creating redundancy. If one seal happens to fail or be compromised, the additional layer serves as a fallback.
  • Perfect Quality: The acoustic sealant is applied in a heavy bead under the bottom plates, as well as each drywall layer. This ensures that each gap or seam at every intersection is sealed, and provides multiple layers of redundancy. In this scenario, the quality of the individual seals are backed up by the several other layers.

Of course, this isn't the only way to achieve near perfect seals, just an example. Many different patterns can be used successfully. Eventually, the number of seals will become irrelevant, as 6, 10, or even 100 perfect seals aren't notably different than only 2 (one located on each side of the wall). However, the redundancy created by the additional seals helps to ensure that the sound reduction performance of the assembly will be good.

 
Even the highest rated and best constructed assembly will fail to achieve its sound reduction potential if compromised by flanking noise that seeps in through ceilings, doors, ductwork, framing connections, and a host of other small seams and gaps. As such, sealing off these flanking paths and the resulting flanking noise where at all possible is just as vital as the selection of your wall, ceiling, or flooring type. The ideal way to address many of these flanking paths is with the use of an acoustical sealant. Differing from standard latex or silicone caulks, our Sound Seal 90 Draft, Smoke, and Acoustical Sealant is specially formulated and designed to remain permanently flexible, exhibit minimal shrinkage, and is tested to ensure it meet important performance specifications. Contact us today for more information, to request samples, or for a quote!

The post Simplifying Sound Reduction: Flanking Noise and Acoustical Sealants appeared first on .

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In the previous entry of our series on sound, we touched on the basics of sound and the main principles of sound reduction and isolation. One of those principles was that of Conduction; more specifically, the concept of flanking pathways. This is particularly relevant due to the role it plays in sound reduction and the usage of acoustical sealants to mitigate that role. In this entry, we’ll discuss the effects of flanking paths and flanking noise. Additionally, we’ll explain the role an acoustical sealant like our Sound Seal 90 Smoke, Draft, and Acoustical Sealant differs from standard latex or silicone caulks and how it can help reduce flanking noise. Finally, we’ll detail the proper application of the acoustical sealant to resume the sound reduction integrity of the assembly.

 

What is Flanking Noise?

In simple terms, flanking noise is the noise which reaches a room by an indirect method; by going over, under, or around barriers intended to provide sound or noise control. Sound, much like air and water will take the path of least resistance between rooms. The routes that sound takes to bypass sound reduction efforts are called flanking paths. While this facet of sound reduction is rarely talked about, it can have huge ramifications in the success of your sound reduction efforts. You may have spent a lot of time planning and money constructing a high performing partition, making sure to address the key principles we discussed in our previous entry – only to find the level of sound reduction nowhere near your desired level.

That’s because no assembly can ever perform better than the level of surrounding flanking noise. In the scenario below, there is no way to improve the performance of the wall. The wall is not failing, the adjacent surfaces are. In order to ensure the sound partition is performing as it should and resulting in the desired level of sound reduction, the flanking paths of the surrounding structures must be addressed.

Diagram of flanking pathways that can reduce the sound reduction performance of a sound wall/partition Us acoustical sealants where possible to reduce impact of flanking noise.

Common flanking paths include:

  • Ceilings – Air and sound leakage around partition walls at ceilings.
  • Doors – Air and sound leakage around doors.
  • Ductwork – Shared ductwork between rooms creates a direct path for sound to travel.
  • Electrical receptacles & light switches – Air and sound leakage around unsealed electrical outlets, switches, or boxes.
  • Floor noise transmission – Floor coverings extending beneath partitions into adjoining rooms create flanking path.
  • Framing connections – Even in decoupled frame design, a solid path through a band joist or drywall panel creates a flanking path for sound.
  • Plumbing penetrations – Air and sound leaks through the penetrations as well as plumbing chaseways that pass between areas.
  • Resilient channel mistakes – Improperly placed screws that penetrate into studs or joists.
  • Partition edge abutments to adjoining walls, ceilings, and floors.

Each of these sources of flanking noise can be minimized in different ways. We’ll be focusing on a few key flanking paths and how the application of acoustical sealants such as our Sound Seal 90 Draft, Smoke, and Acoustical Sealant can be used to minimize their impact.

 

Understanding Acoustical Sealants

It is important to understand that acoustical sealants aren’t the same as ordinary silicone or latex caulk. The key difference to note is that acoustical sealants are formulated to remain permanently flexible. Over time, a sealant will experience expansion and contraction due to fluctuations in humidity, as well as shearing stress caused by slight movement of the built structure. Caulks that do not remain flexible can eventually crack or shrink, or separate from the substrates – both causing the seal to fail and creating a seam or gap that allows for the passage of sound. Additionally, a good quality acoustical sealants will show reduced shrinkage in comparison to standard caulks. Shrinkage of the sealant can result in the bead tearing away from one or more of the substrates, once again creating a pathway for sound to travel through. Our Sound Seal 90 experiences only 15.4% shrinkage, compared to the 20-25% exhibited my other acoustical sealants.

Furthermore, a quality acoustical joint sealant will have been tested by accredited laboratories to meet a host of standards and specifications.
ASTM-C834 for example, is a standard which classifies a latex sealant according to its flexibility based on the results of many other tests. ASTM-E90 measures the sound transmission loss of building partitions and elements. Many of these tests or certifications are required by building codes as per the ICC’s International Building Code (IBC). For example: IBC Section 120.7 states that “Walls, partitions, and floor/ceiling assemblies separating dwelling units from each other or from public or service areas shall have a sound transmission class (STC) of not less than 50 for air-borne noise when tested in accordance with ASTM-E90. Penetrations or openings in construction assemblies…shall be sealed, lined, insulated, or otherwise treated to maintain the required ratings.”

For a full list of technical documentation on our Sound Seal 90 Acoustical Joint sealant, please visit our product page.

An important understanding to have and one that many often times confuse is the relationship between an acoustical joint sealant and an STC rating. STC ratings apply to the entirety of the system itself: partitions, ceilings, floors, doors, windows, and exterior wall configurations, and not necessarily to their individual components. These assemblies are usually tested in laboratory settings in order to identify their sound reduction potential, expressed as an STC value. These environments are highly controlled, with great pains to minimize the effect of flanking noise that that the results reflect the performance of the partition itself.

In the field, however, conditions are much different. Typically, the assembly will exhibit lower performance than in laboratory conditions due to the existence of flanking noise. This noise can be present at the time of initial construction & insulation, or when the assembly is altered post-installation (one may add an additional outlet, or cut out to accommodate mounted television wires, for example).

In such cases, acoustical joint sealants are used only to resume (and in some cases improve) the sound reducing integrity of the assembly. No acoustical joint sealant inherently carries an STC rating. Any stated STC rating is simply the highest STC rated assembly that sealant has been used or tested in to resume the integrity of.

 

Using Acoustical Sealants

Typically, acoustical sealants are used in the following applications to reduce flanking noise, thus enabling the wall to achieve, maintain, and potentially improve the desired level of sound reduction:

  • Top and bottom runners prior to application of drywall
  • Outer edge perimeter joints of drywall
  • Cut-outs and utility penetrations
  • Bottom of wall, wall to wall, and head of wall joints
  • Penetrations for metallic, insulated metallic and non-metallic pipe, ducts, conduits, cables, and wires in non-fire rated smoke partitions and/or acoustical assemblies
  • In conjunction with resilient mounts (such as resilient channels or sound clips)

When applying an acoustical sealant it is critical to ensure you achieve a high quality seal. Seal quality is essential in minimizing sound transmission through these flanking pathways. Even the slightest seal failure can have huge ramifications – a gap that makes up 1% of surface area can allow 50% of the sound to pass through it.

  1. Ensure that all surfaces are cleaned of any debris or material that may prevent or deter adhesion. Common debris types include dirt, loose particulate, existing sealants, grease, etc.
  2. Load a tube of acoustical sealant into a standard quart sized caulking gun. We recommend our Sound Seal 90 Draft, Smoke, and Acoustical Sealant.
  3. Cut nozzle to allow recommended bead size. Bead size may range from 3/8″ to 1/4″, depending on application.
  4. Apply sealant on underside of all runners at the ceiling and floor prior to the installation of drywall, the outer edge perimeter joints, cut-outs, and utility penetrations. Apply sealant to the joint where partial drywall sheets meet window and door frames.
    • When sealing cutouts in drywall made to accommodate utility penetrations such as electrical outlets or light switches, coat the the inside perimeter of these cutouts. Boxes should be installed before sealant sets. Instead of a sealant, putty pads like our Fire-Rated Putty Pads, may be used.
    • When filling gaps larger than 1/4″ around, fill with loose filler material or backer rod before applying acoustical sealant to complete the filling. Backer rod width should be roughly twice the width of the gap to be caulked.
  5. Sound Seal 90 has a tooling time of approximately 15 minutes. The sealant may be tooled using finger, putty knife, spatula, or other means. Use water or wet cloth to clean tools and excess sealant following each installation. Due to the permanent flexibility of acoustical sealants, any residual amounts may interfere with adhesion and compromise the quality of the seal or adhesion to additional products like drywall tape or other joint compounds.
  6. If using a bulk caulking gun, load sealant into gun as directed by bulk gun manufacturer or sealant manufacturer.

Diagram showing the proper placement of acoustical sealants to ensure a high quality seal against sound transmission

The above diagram shows examples of acoustical sealant placement of varying qualities in an assembly. The assembly is constructed of framing with two panels of drywall with damping compound between each layer, located on either side of the stud.

  • Poor Quality: The acoustical sealant is applied underneath the frame only. This allows sound to seep in on either side of the assembly, with only a single bead of sealant impeding its path. Additionally, the layers of drywall, even though damped, can and will still experience minute vibrations that help transfer sound.
  • Good Quality: The sealant is applied at the intersection of the framing and innermost layers of drywall. This is an improvement over the “poor” sealant placement as it seals the seam between the innermost layer of drywall and the bottom plate on both sides.
  • Very Good Quality: The sealant is applied at the intersection of the bottom plate and the innermost layers of drywall and underneath the bottom plate. This creates a seal on either side of the frame, creating redundancy. If one seal happens to fail or be compromised, the additional layer serves as a fallback.
  • Perfect Quality: The acoustic sealant is applied in a heavy bead under the bottom plates, as well as each drywall layer. This ensures that each gap or seam at every intersection is sealed, and provides multiple layers of redundancy. In this scenario, the quality of the individual seals are backed up by the several other layers.

Of course, this isn’t the only way to achieve near perfect seals, just an example. Many different patterns can be used successfully. Eventually, the number of seals will become irrelevant, as 6, 10, or even 100 perfect seals aren’t notably different than only 2 (one located on each side of the wall). However, the redundancy created by the additional seals helps to ensure that the sound reduction performance of the assembly will be good.

 
Even the highest rated and best constructed assembly will fail to achieve its sound reduction potential if compromised by flanking noise that seeps in through ceilings, doors, ductwork, framing connections, and a host of other small seams and gaps. As such, sealing off these flanking paths and the resulting flanking noise where at all possible is just as vital as the selection of your wall, ceiling, or flooring type. The ideal way to address many of these flanking paths is with the use of an acoustical sealant. Differing from standard latex or silicone caulks, our Sound Seal 90 Draft, Smoke, and Acoustical Sealant is specially formulated and designed to remain permanently flexible, exhibit minimal shrinkage, and is tested to ensure it meet important performance specifications. Contact us today for more information, to request samples, or for a quote!

The post Simplifying Sound Reduction: Flanking Noise and Acoustical Sealants appeared first on .

]]> Simplifying Sound Reduction: The Basics /sound-reduction-soundproofing-basics/ Mon, 02 Oct 2017 14:08:58 +0000 /?p=5425 Most individuals understand the need to seal a built structure against the infiltration of heat, cold, and air pollution. However, the importance of sound reduction -sealing against unwanted noise infiltration and transmission - is often times overlooked. The importance tends to come to the forefront when building occupants complain about outside noises (such as traffic, yard work, etc) seeping in, or internal noises (such as footsteps and conversations) travelling from room to room. In this multi-part series we'll focus on how to properly, effectively, and efficiently reduce the transmission of unwanted sound in the built environment.

On the surface, the concept of preventing sound infiltration and achieving desired levels sound reduction seems pretty straightforward: Put soundproof material between the structure and/or its occupants and the source of the noise. In reality,things aren't quite that simple. Fortunately, the basics of sound reduction can be boiled down to a handful of key, universal principles. Knowing, understanding, and utilizing these principles enables us to maximize the efficiency of sound reduction efforts.

 

What is Sound?

Just like electricity and light, sound is a form of energy. Sound is made when air molecules vibrate and move in a pattern of wave - sound waves. These sound waves travel through transmission mediums such as solids, liquid, or gases.
When sound hits a barrier, like a sheet of drywall for example, that barrier will vibrate. This, in turn causes the air on the other side of the barrier to vibrate, thus transferring sound through the wall.

When we seek to reduce sound transmission, there is no singular "catch-all" method that will do the trick. Instead, we utilize a mix of solutions that address various principles of sound reduction to achieve the desired performance.

 

Principle One: Mass

The more mass an object has, the better it will impede the transmission of sound. Just as it's harder to drive a nail through wood than foam board, it's harder for sound to vibrate very heavy material than very light material. The less an object is vibrated, the less it in turn vibrates the air on the other side of it, and the less sound is transmitted. Addressing the principle of mass in construction is most effective versus airborne sound (voices and music, for example), but not very good against noises which are transmitted through the structure itself (such as footsteps, or vibrations caused by machinery). Drywall is an example of a material using this property.

However, simply adding more mass (or in our case, drywall) won't do the trick. Adding additional mass alone, especially considering the costs of drywall installations, is one of the least efficient methods available to builders today. To make notable changes in sound reduction you must make very large changes in mass. Even doubling the amount of drywall used in construction can result in a change of only three to four decibels, which is near the minimum amount an average person can detect.

 

Principle Two: Decoupling

Some sound is transmitted through the structure of the building itself through direct paths where materials are joined or connected. Examples of this include two layers of drywall adhered to one another as a single panel, or two walls sharing the same set of stud. In these examples, sound comes into contact with the material on one side, travelling directly through it and into the material on the other side.

Decoupling is meant to separate the attachment of parts of the structure by introducing gaps that break the direct path of sound. This prevents the sound (and its vibration) from travelling along its path. This can be achieved by reducing the number of connections using resilient sound clips or resilient channel as well as breaking the path entirely using specialty framing techniques such as staggered stud or double stud walls.

Diagram showing the difference between Coupled and Decoupled walls. Coupled walls allow direct paths for sound to transfer, while decoupled walls break these paths.

The diagram above shows the construction of a conventional, coupled wall and a decoupled wall using a double stud framing practice. The coupled wall is directly connected; the drywall panels on both sides are connected to the same set of studs. This provides a direct path for sound to travel through. As sound contacts one side of the wall, it vibrates that side's materials. These vibrations are directly transferred to the materials on the other side, resulting in more sound being transmitted. The decoupled wall's two sides have been fully separated. This breaks the direct path of sound. When sound contacts one side of the wall, it vibrates that side's materials. Since the sides are completely isolated from one another, this prevents the vibrations from transferring to the materials on the other side, reducing the amount of sound being transmitted.

Due to the intricacies of decoupling, it must be planned in detail and installed correctly. Failing to do so can worsen the sound reduction performance of the assembly considerably. Ideally, decoupling is done during the initial design and construction of the structure. While it can be added later, it can be costly and require lots of effort as it requires tearing out and replacing existing structures.

 

Principle Three: Resonance

Issues with resonance typically arise when attempting to decouple, or when using the same type of material in multiple layers of the assembly. By introducing space between the materials (as in decoupling), you improve the sound reduction performance, but only at certain frequencies. When objects have been decoupled the air in the cavity created by decoupling acts quite similarly to a spring - resulting in resonance. At and around this resonance point, the performance of the assembly is actually worse than had it not been decoupled.

In order to address this concern, one must both lower the resonance frequency by either adding additional mass, increasing the depth of the air cavity, and.or adding insulation (if none is present) while damping the decoupled system with a damping compound.

Having two materials of the same type in the assembly (either as a result of the base design or through an attempt to create additional mass) will exacerbate the weak performance of that material at that resonance point. This can be avoided by using different materials, or materials of different thicknesses. For example, if one side of an assembly has 1/2" drywall, use 5/" drywall on the other side. When adding additional layers of drywall or wood to the same side, then use a different thickness for each layer.

 

Principle Four: Absorption

Installing insulation in a wall or ceiling cavity improves sound reduction by absorbing sound as it travels. Additionally, it can lower the resonant frequency in decoupled assemblies. However, while absorption does have a role to play in sound reduction, it is the least impactful of the principles. As such, the type of insulation to be used shouldn't be something you spent too much time thinking about. Common fiberglass insulation is a good sound absorber and has shown to be as effective as any other type of insulation.

Diagram of insulation reducing sound transmission in coupled and decoupled sound barrier assemblies.

Absorption is at its most effective when used as part of a decoupled and/or damped wall. Sound transmission is reduced as it travels through the isolated components of the structure, and through the insulation. In a traditional wall (coupled, and/or non-damped assemblies) with no insulation, sound travels through non insulated air cavities. Even with insulation in traditional (coupled, and/or non-damped walls) sound easily passes through studs, bypassing the insulation altogether.

Principle Five: Damping

 
Damping is the process of "deadening" your drywall, subfloors, or any other barrier to eliminate vibration. With no vibration, sound is prevented from passing through them. An easy way to see the effects of damping is tap a water glass with a fork. You'll notice it ring. Tap it a second time, but clamp the glass with your fingers. You'll notice the sound suddenly stopping. Your fingers deaden the glass, stopping the vibrations that produce the ringing sound.

When seeking to soundproof, or reduce the amount of sound transmitted from one material (and thus area) to the next, damping is achieved with damping compounds. These compounds work by converting sound energy into heat energy via friction. Damping is the most effective principle against low frequency noises such as the hum of construction machinery or the heavy bass of music from stereo systems.

 

Part Five: Conduction

Conduction is best defined as the vibrations from sound transmitting through conductive materials into other conductive materials such as wood framing, plumbing pipes, and sheet metal. This sound transmission is indirect, so the loss from the transmission is difficult to predict, but can be significant. This is typically seen in non-decoupled walls, and can prevent these non-decoupled walls from attaining a high level of sound reduction performance.

Aside from the performance of walls, conduction also plays a significant role in flanking noise - noise which travels from one room to another via indirect means. Often times, this means through unsealed joints, voids, and penetrations typically found in building construction. These indirect routes that sound travels are commonly referred to as flanking paths.

The importance of reducing flanking noise cannot be overstated. No assembly can ever perform better than the level of flanking noise.

Diagram of Soundproofing, sound reduction efforts of a sound barrier wall compromised by examples of flanking paths. Use Sound Seal 90 Acoustical Joint Sealant to eliminate flanking paths and flanking noise.

In the scenario above, there is no improvement that can be made to the wall itself to increase its performance. The wall is not failing, the adjacent surfaces are. The wall may be perfectly built and carry a high rating. However, indirect sound travelling through flanking paths such as ductwork, ceiling, floor, electrical outlets, and any non-sealed seams or gaps in overall construction undermine the sound wall barrier and reduce its effectiveness at reducing sound transmission.

It is this principle that acoustical joint sealants like our Sound Seal 90 Draft, Smoke, and Acoustical Sound Sealant primarily addresses. In our next entry in our series on sound, we will be detailing flanking paths and the important role acoustical joint sealants play in eliminating them.

Basic Sound Reduction Wrap-Up

These principles all work independently of one another to achieve a common goal - sound reduction or soundproofing. Taking what we know of each principle, we can combine them into a few good rules of thumb to improve sound reduction.

  1. Increase the mass of the assembly, making sure to use varied materials and/or thicknesses when possible.
  2. Decouple assemblies. This is ideally done during initial design and construction, but can be done later for areas that were previously coupled.
  3. Add damping to the system.
  4. Add absorption in the form of insulation where there previously was none and/or increase the amount of insulation already present.
  5. Identify any flanking paths and take measures to seal them appropriately.

 
If you've already taken measures to reduce the sound transmission of an assembly, room, or structure but find that it is still not achieving the desired (or required) level of reduction you may want to identify a principle(s) that have been inadequately addressed to gain the most improvement. If you'd like more information on our Sound Seal 90, or have questions regarding your sound reduction application, don't hesitate to contact us!

The post Simplifying Sound Reduction: The Basics appeared first on .

]]>

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Most individuals understand the need to seal a built structure against the infiltration of heat, cold, and air pollution. However, the importance of sound reduction -sealing against unwanted noise infiltration and transmission – is often times overlooked. The importance tends to come to the forefront when building occupants complain about outside noises (such as traffic, yard work, etc) seeping in, or internal noises (such as footsteps and conversations) travelling from room to room. In this multi-part series we’ll focus on how to properly, effectively, and efficiently reduce the transmission of unwanted sound in the built environment.

On the surface, the concept of preventing sound infiltration and achieving desired levels sound reduction seems pretty straightforward: Put soundproof material between the structure and/or its occupants and the source of the noise. In reality,things aren’t quite that simple. Fortunately, the basics of sound reduction can be boiled down to a handful of key, universal principles. Knowing, understanding, and utilizing these principles enables us to maximize the efficiency of sound reduction efforts.

 

What is Sound?

Just like electricity and light, sound is a form of energy. Sound is made when air molecules vibrate and move in a pattern of wave – sound waves. These sound waves travel through transmission mediums such as solids, liquid, or gases.
When sound hits a barrier, like a sheet of drywall for example, that barrier will vibrate. This, in turn causes the air on the other side of the barrier to vibrate, thus transferring sound through the wall.

When we seek to reduce sound transmission, there is no singular “catch-all” method that will do the trick. Instead, we utilize a mix of solutions that address various principles of sound reduction to achieve the desired performance.

 

Principle One: Mass

The more mass an object has, the better it will impede the transmission of sound. Just as it’s harder to drive a nail through wood than foam board, it’s harder for sound to vibrate very heavy material than very light material. The less an object is vibrated, the less it in turn vibrates the air on the other side of it, and the less sound is transmitted. Addressing the principle of mass in construction is most effective versus airborne sound (voices and music, for example), but not very good against noises which are transmitted through the structure itself (such as footsteps, or vibrations caused by machinery). Drywall is an example of a material using this property.

However, simply adding more mass (or in our case, drywall) won’t do the trick. Adding additional mass alone, especially considering the costs of drywall installations, is one of the least efficient methods available to builders today. To make notable changes in sound reduction you must make very large changes in mass. Even doubling the amount of drywall used in construction can result in a change of only three to four decibels, which is near the minimum amount an average person can detect.

 

Principle Two: Decoupling

Some sound is transmitted through the structure of the building itself through direct paths where materials are joined or connected. Examples of this include two layers of drywall adhered to one another as a single panel, or two walls sharing the same set of stud. In these examples, sound comes into contact with the material on one side, travelling directly through it and into the material on the other side.

Decoupling is meant to separate the attachment of parts of the structure by introducing gaps that break the direct path of sound. This prevents the sound (and its vibration) from travelling along its path. This can be achieved by reducing the number of connections using resilient sound clips or resilient channel as well as breaking the path entirely using specialty framing techniques such as staggered stud or double stud walls.

Diagram showing the difference between Coupled and Decoupled walls. Coupled walls allow direct paths for sound to transfer, while decoupled walls break these paths.

The diagram above shows the construction of a conventional, coupled wall and a decoupled wall using a double stud framing practice. The coupled wall is directly connected; the drywall panels on both sides are connected to the same set of studs. This provides a direct path for sound to travel through. As sound contacts one side of the wall, it vibrates that side’s materials. These vibrations are directly transferred to the materials on the other side, resulting in more sound being transmitted. The decoupled wall’s two sides have been fully separated. This breaks the direct path of sound. When sound contacts one side of the wall, it vibrates that side’s materials. Since the sides are completely isolated from one another, this prevents the vibrations from transferring to the materials on the other side, reducing the amount of sound being transmitted.

Due to the intricacies of decoupling, it must be planned in detail and installed correctly. Failing to do so can worsen the sound reduction performance of the assembly considerably. Ideally, decoupling is done during the initial design and construction of the structure. While it can be added later, it can be costly and require lots of effort as it requires tearing out and replacing existing structures.

 

Principle Three: Resonance

Issues with resonance typically arise when attempting to decouple, or when using the same type of material in multiple layers of the assembly. By introducing space between the materials (as in decoupling), you improve the sound reduction performance, but only at certain frequencies. When objects have been decoupled the air in the cavity created by decoupling acts quite similarly to a spring – resulting in resonance. At and around this resonance point, the performance of the assembly is actually worse than had it not been decoupled.

In order to address this concern, one must both lower the resonance frequency by either adding additional mass, increasing the depth of the air cavity, and.or adding insulation (if none is present) while damping the decoupled system with a damping compound.

Having two materials of the same type in the assembly (either as a result of the base design or through an attempt to create additional mass) will exacerbate the weak performance of that material at that resonance point. This can be avoided by using different materials, or materials of different thicknesses. For example, if one side of an assembly has 1/2″ drywall, use 5/” drywall on the other side. When adding additional layers of drywall or wood to the same side, then use a different thickness for each layer.

 

Principle Four: Absorption

Installing insulation in a wall or ceiling cavity improves sound reduction by absorbing sound as it travels. Additionally, it can lower the resonant frequency in decoupled assemblies. However, while absorption does have a role to play in sound reduction, it is the least impactful of the principles. As such, the type of insulation to be used shouldn’t be something you spent too much time thinking about. Common fiberglass insulation is a good sound absorber and has shown to be as effective as any other type of insulation.

Diagram of insulation reducing sound transmission in coupled and decoupled sound barrier assemblies.

Absorption is at its most effective when used as part of a decoupled and/or damped wall. Sound transmission is reduced as it travels through the isolated components of the structure, and through the insulation. In a traditional wall (coupled, and/or non-damped assemblies) with no insulation, sound travels through non insulated air cavities. Even with insulation in traditional (coupled, and/or non-damped walls) sound easily passes through studs, bypassing the insulation altogether.

Principle Five: Damping

 
Damping is the process of “deadening” your drywall, subfloors, or any other barrier to eliminate vibration. With no vibration, sound is prevented from passing through them. An easy way to see the effects of damping is tap a water glass with a fork. You’ll notice it ring. Tap it a second time, but clamp the glass with your fingers. You’ll notice the sound suddenly stopping. Your fingers deaden the glass, stopping the vibrations that produce the ringing sound.

When seeking to soundproof, or reduce the amount of sound transmitted from one material (and thus area) to the next, damping is achieved with damping compounds. These compounds work by converting sound energy into heat energy via friction. Damping is the most effective principle against low frequency noises such as the hum of construction machinery or the heavy bass of music from stereo systems.

 

Part Five: Conduction

Conduction is best defined as the vibrations from sound transmitting through conductive materials into other conductive materials such as wood framing, plumbing pipes, and sheet metal. This sound transmission is indirect, so the loss from the transmission is difficult to predict, but can be significant. This is typically seen in non-decoupled walls, and can prevent these non-decoupled walls from attaining a high level of sound reduction performance.

Aside from the performance of walls, conduction also plays a significant role in flanking noise – noise which travels from one room to another via indirect means. Often times, this means through unsealed joints, voids, and penetrations typically found in building construction. These indirect routes that sound travels are commonly referred to as flanking paths.

The importance of reducing flanking noise cannot be overstated. No assembly can ever perform better than the level of flanking noise.

Diagram of Soundproofing, sound reduction efforts of a sound barrier wall compromised by examples of flanking paths. Use Sound Seal 90 Acoustical Joint Sealant to eliminate flanking paths and flanking noise.

In the scenario above, there is no improvement that can be made to the wall itself to increase its performance. The wall is not failing, the adjacent surfaces are. The wall may be perfectly built and carry a high rating. However, indirect sound travelling through flanking paths such as ductwork, ceiling, floor, electrical outlets, and any non-sealed seams or gaps in overall construction undermine the sound wall barrier and reduce its effectiveness at reducing sound transmission.

It is this principle that acoustical joint sealants like our Sound Seal 90 Draft, Smoke, and Acoustical Sound Sealant primarily addresses. In our next entry in our series on sound, we will be detailing flanking paths and the important role acoustical joint sealants play in eliminating them.

Basic Sound Reduction Wrap-Up

These principles all work independently of one another to achieve a common goal – sound reduction or soundproofing. Taking what we know of each principle, we can combine them into a few good rules of thumb to improve sound reduction.

  1. Increase the mass of the assembly, making sure to use varied materials and/or thicknesses when possible.
  2. Decouple assemblies. This is ideally done during initial design and construction, but can be done later for areas that were previously coupled.
  3. Add damping to the system.
  4. Add absorption in the form of insulation where there previously was none and/or increase the amount of insulation already present.
  5. Identify any flanking paths and take measures to seal them appropriately.

 
If you’ve already taken measures to reduce the sound transmission of an assembly, room, or structure but find that it is still not achieving the desired (or required) level of reduction you may want to identify a principle(s) that have been inadequately addressed to gain the most improvement. If you’d like more information on our Sound Seal 90, or have questions regarding your sound reduction application, don’t hesitate to contact us!

The post Simplifying Sound Reduction: The Basics appeared first on .

]]> Everkem Adds Fixed Nozzle As TruSil 100 Packaging Option /everkem-fixed-nozzle-trusil-100-silicone-sealant/ Thu, 02 Mar 2017 15:52:21 +0000 /?p=2753 As part of our commitment to customer-driven solutions, Everkem Diversified Products is pleased to announce the addition of fixed nozzle tubes to our TruSil 100 line of Silicone Sealants, thus offering both fixed nozzle and removable nozzle packaging options for the product.

Fixed Nozzle TruSil 100 Silicone Sealant

The line was launched with a screw on nozzle which allowed for easy cleaning, storage, and reuse after the product had been opened. It also allows a smaller, precision-focused bead size easier to achieve via the nozzle being able to be cut to a smaller bead size and swapped out across multiple tubes.

While we received some great feedback on the removable nozzle from a wide portion of our customer base, we also realized that there are some customers for whom the removable cartridge is just not a good fit for their applications. After listening to this feedback, we're happy to add a fixed nozzle as a packing solution that can meet all of our customers needs, completely. We will still carry TruSil 100 in cartridges with removable nozzles while offering the fixed nozzle option.

Fixed nozzles are preferred by applicators who typically apply caulk in bulk, using the entire tube at once, thus having very little need for storing partially used tubes. Additionally, fixed nozzles allow a larger bead size since the nozzle can be cut closer to the base.

Additionally, there are safety concerns that a fixed nozzle can help address. Applicators who work on ladders, roofs, or in other high up areas may not have the 'free hands' to be able to screw off a nozzle, cut it, puncture it, and screw it back on. Most of these individuals make heavy use of the nozzle-cutters built into most caulking guns. So, for these individuals a fixed nozzle is not only more convenient, but safer as well.

Fixed nozzles are currently available in clear with additional colors available upon request. For ordering purposes, fixed nozzle cartridge part numbers are the same, with a simple addition of "-FN" at the end. Ex: TS100C-FN

Available in several popular colors and mildew resistant options, TruSil 100 is NSF-51 Certified, ensuring that it does not cause food borne illnesses when coming into contact with food and/or beverages – enabling it to be used in and around food processing and storage applications.

TruSil 100 meets ASTM-C920 performance criteria (+/- 25% joint movement), remains flexible at temperatures as low as -55°F (-48.3°C), and can withstand continuous exposure to temperatures up to 400°F (204.4°C), all while meeting low Volatile Organic Compounds (V.O.C.) requirements.

Click here for more information on TruSil 100. You can also request free additional information, free samples, or a quote by a href="/contact-us/">contacting us today or call us directly at 1-800-638-3160!

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As part of our commitment to customer-driven solutions, Everkem Diversified Products is pleased to announce the addition of fixed nozzle tubes to our TruSil 100 line of Silicone Sealants, thus offering both fixed nozzle and removable nozzle packaging options for the product.

Fixed Nozzle TruSil 100 Silicone Sealant

The line was launched with a screw on nozzle which allowed for easy cleaning, storage, and reuse after the product had been opened. It also allows a smaller, precision-focused bead size easier to achieve via the nozzle being able to be cut to a smaller bead size and swapped out across multiple tubes.

While we received some great feedback on the removable nozzle from a wide portion of our customer base, we also realized that there are some customers for whom the removable cartridge is just not a good fit for their applications. After listening to this feedback, we’re happy to add a fixed nozzle as a packing solution that can meet all of our customers needs, completely. We will still carry TruSil 100 in cartridges with removable nozzles while offering the fixed nozzle option.

Fixed nozzles are preferred by applicators who typically apply caulk in bulk, using the entire tube at once, thus having very little need for storing partially used tubes. Additionally, fixed nozzles allow a larger bead size since the nozzle can be cut closer to the base.

Additionally, there are safety concerns that a fixed nozzle can help address. Applicators who work on ladders, roofs, or in other high up areas may not have the ‘free hands’ to be able to screw off a nozzle, cut it, puncture it, and screw it back on. Most of these individuals make heavy use of the nozzle-cutters built into most caulking guns. So, for these individuals a fixed nozzle is not only more convenient, but safer as well.

Fixed nozzles are currently available in clear with additional colors available upon request. For ordering purposes, fixed nozzle cartridge part numbers are the same, with a simple addition of “-FN” at the end. Ex: TS100C-FN

Available in several popular colors and mildew resistant options, TruSil 100 is NSF-51 Certified, ensuring that it does not cause food borne illnesses when coming into contact with food and/or beverages – enabling it to be used in and around food processing and storage applications.

TruSil 100 meets ASTM-C920 performance criteria (+/- 25% joint movement), remains flexible at temperatures as low as -55°F (-48.3°C), and can withstand continuous exposure to temperatures up to 400°F (204.4°C), all while meeting low Volatile Organic Compounds (V.O.C.) requirements.

Click here for more information on TruSil 100. You can also request free additional information, free samples, or a quote by a href=”/contact-us/”>contacting us today or call us directly at 1-800-638-3160!

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]]> Everkem Now Offers Hand Warmer – Stay Warm & Productive This Winter! /everkem-offers-hand-warmers-as-seasonal-item-this-winter/ Wed, 25 Jan 2017 15:32:49 +0000 /?p=2746 [et_pb_section bb_built="1"][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text]

Temperatures across the country are dropping as winter swings into full effect. However, we know that there is still plenty of work to be done, regardless of what the thermometer says. That’s why we’re pleased to add Heat Factory® Hand Warmers to our seasonal product mix – to keep you safe and warm while you work hard!

Hand Warmer Display

Working in a cold environment can involve several adverse effects on human performance and health. Workers suffering from exposure to the cold can experience thermal discomfort, increased strain, decreased performance and cold-related diseases and injuries.

The Heat Factory Hand Warmer is a soft, lightweight pouch containing biodegradable mixture of iron powder, charcoal, salt, sawdust, and vermiculite. When exposed to air, an oxidation process occurs which generates warm, comforting heat.

Heat Factory Hand Warmers work hard to keep you warm so you can stay safe & productive:

  • Start fast & lasts long - up to 10 hours!
  • Ideal for gloves and pockets, or anywhere comforting heat is desired.
  • Small size fits virtually anywhere – tool and tackle boxes, backpacks, glove compartments, tool belt pockets, and more.
  • 3 year shelf life – buy today, use them when you need them with no worry of spoilage
  • Safe, non-toxic, odorless, and biodegradable
  • Proudly made in the USA

These hand warmers aren’t just for work, though. Their warm, comforting heat is ideal for all sorts of cold-weather recreational activities like winter camping & climbing, sledding & ice skating, or just enjoying the snowfall!

Contractors: Purchase some for yourself, or your team; show them you appreciate them and their hard work and have their comfort and safety in mind by helping to keep them warm and productive!

Distributors: Heay Factory Hand Warmers come in an attractive self-merchandising display, making them ideal point of purchase items and provide a powerful cross-sell opportunity for your sales staff.

Hand Warmers also make great add-ons to existing orders! Combine one box with existing orders to meet minimums, or order four boxes to receive prepaid freight. Contact us by filling out our contact form or call us directly at 1-800-638-3160 to place an order for warmth today!

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Temperatures across the country are dropping as winter swings into full effect. However, we know that there is still plenty of work to be done, regardless of what the thermometer says. That’s why we’re pleased to add Heat Factory® Hand Warmers to our seasonal product mix – to keep you safe and warm while you work hard!

Hand Warmer Display

Working in a cold environment can involve several adverse effects on human performance and health. Workers suffering from exposure to the cold can experience thermal discomfort, increased strain, decreased performance and cold-related diseases and injuries.

The Heat Factory Hand Warmer is a soft, lightweight pouch containing biodegradable mixture of iron powder, charcoal, salt, sawdust, and vermiculite. When exposed to air, an oxidation process occurs which generates warm, comforting heat.

Heat Factory Hand Warmers work hard to keep you warm so you can stay safe & productive:

  • Start fast & lasts long – up to 10 hours!
  • Ideal for gloves and pockets, or anywhere comforting heat is desired.
  • Small size fits virtually anywhere – tool and tackle boxes, backpacks, glove compartments, tool belt pockets, and more.
  • 3 year shelf life – buy today, use them when you need them with no worry of spoilage
  • Safe, non-toxic, odorless, and biodegradable
  • Proudly made in the USA

These hand warmers aren’t just for work, though. Their warm, comforting heat is ideal for all sorts of cold-weather recreational activities like winter camping & climbing, sledding & ice skating, or just enjoying the snowfall!

Contractors: Purchase some for yourself, or your team; show them you appreciate them and their hard work and have their comfort and safety in mind by helping to keep them warm and productive!

Distributors: Heay Factory Hand Warmers come in an attractive self-merchandising display, making them ideal point of purchase items and provide a powerful cross-sell opportunity for your sales staff.

Hand Warmers also make great add-ons to existing orders! Combine one box with existing orders to meet minimums, or order four boxes to receive prepaid freight. Contact us by filling out our contact form or call us directly at 1-800-638-3160 to place an order for warmth today!

The post Everkem Now Offers Hand Warmer – Stay Warm & Productive This Winter! appeared first on .

]]> Everkem Announces Launch Of Thermal Seal – All In One Foam Sealant /everkem-launches-all-in-one-foam-sealant/ Wed, 13 May 2015 17:51:24 +0000 /?p=2503 EVERKEM INTRODUCES THERMAL SEAL
ALL-IN-ONE WINDOW & DOOR / FIREBLOCKING FOAM SEALANT

ThermalSeal-All-In-One-Fireblocking-and-Window-and-Door-Foam-Sealant

In our never ending pursuit to provide our customers with high quality, performance driven products to help them succeed, Everkem is pleased to announce the launch of our Thermal Seal All-In-One Foam Sealant, and its addition to our comprehensive line of foam sealant solutions.

Thermal Seal All-In-One Foam Sealant possesses a unique All-In-One Fireblocking and Window & Door / Insulating formulationThermal Seal All-In-One Foam Sealant was developed to merge quality, efficiency, and performance into one convenient product. Its 'All-In-One' formulation enables it to serve not only as a superior, low pressure, expanding  Window & Door / Insulating foam that is AAMA 812-10 compliant and proven not to bow window or door frames; but as a UL evaluated fireblocking foam for use in Type V non-rated 1 & 2 family residential construction. The All-In-One formulation is a boon to contractors/installers and distributors alike. For installers, it helps reduce the number of products required to perform common, yet vitally important applications of building construction, renovation, and upfitting; while helping distributors decrease unique SKU's by potentially replacing multiple products.

Increased closed cell content offers key benefits to the all-in-one foam sealant formulationThermal Seal also possesses increased closed cell content when compared to other gun-dispensed foams commonly found in the market, thereby not only increasing the R-value (the capacity of an insulating material to resist the flow of heat) but the product's overall strength, and resistance to the leakage of air and water vapor, while retaining the inherent cost effectiveness of open-cell formulations.

Thermal Seal, colored orange for ease of identification, quickly expands to seal off gap to effectively fireblocking requirements in Type V residential construction. This includes the annular space around wires, vents, pipes, ducts, and other mechanical penetrants; as well as common window & door applications such as voids, gaps, cracks, and spaces between window and door jambs / framing.  Its this expansive property that enables one 24 oz. can of Thermal Seal All-In-One Foam Sealant to yield up to the equivalent of 30+ standard caulk tubes. After application, Thermal Seal is tack free in as little as 5 minutes, able to be cut after an hour, and fully cures in 12-24 hours.

An All-In-One Foam Sealants, such as Thermal Seal, help reduce both project timelines and costs.Thermal Seal is designed to provide top-quality performance as efficiently as possible. Installers will find themselves switching out cans less often due to the product's high yield and All-In-One formulation while retaining cost effectiveness per R unit thanks to Thermal Seal's increased closed cell content. In addition, it allows the installer to move onto new areas or tasks more quickly due to the quick set-up time - all of which contributes to quicker project turnaround at less cost.

Click to view the Thermal Seal product page.

 

Fireblocking is required by the International Building Code for Type V residential construction.  It is not to be used as a firestop in commercial construction, in any hourly rated assemblies, where a firestop is required, or any application or geographic location where its usage is prohibited by building codes. Always consult with local compliance authorities prior to use. FlameTech FB Fireblocking Foam Sealant is  for professional use only and should be used with the proper training and personal protective equipment. Refer to our technical data sheet & safety data sheet (found on our product page) for further information, or contact us directly.

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EVERKEM INTRODUCES THERMAL SEAL

ALL-IN-ONE WINDOW & DOOR / FIREBLOCKING FOAM SEALANT

ThermalSeal-All-In-One-Fireblocking-and-Window-and-Door-Foam-Sealant

In our never ending pursuit to provide our customers with high quality, performance driven products to help them succeed, Everkem is pleased to announce the launch of our Thermal Seal All-In-One Foam Sealant, and its addition to our comprehensive line of foam sealant solutions.

Thermal Seal All-In-One Foam Sealant possesses a unique All-In-One Fireblocking and Window & Door / Insulating formulationThermal Seal All-In-One Foam Sealant was developed to merge quality, efficiency, and performance into one convenient product. Its ‘All-In-One’ formulation enables it to serve not only as a superior, low pressure, expanding  Window & Door / Insulating foam that is AAMA 812-10 compliant and proven not to bow window or door frames; but as a UL evaluated fireblocking foam for use in Type V non-rated 1 & 2 family residential construction. The All-In-One formulation is a boon to contractors/installers and distributors alike. For installers, it helps reduce the number of products required to perform common, yet vitally important applications of building construction, renovation, and upfitting; while helping distributors decrease unique SKU’s by potentially replacing multiple products.

Increased closed cell content offers key benefits to the all-in-one foam sealant formulationThermal Seal also possesses increased closed cell content when compared to other gun-dispensed foams commonly found in the market, thereby not only increasing the R-value (the capacity of an insulating material to resist the flow of heat) but the product’s overall strength, and resistance to the leakage of air and water vapor, while retaining the inherent cost effectiveness of open-cell formulations.

Thermal Seal, colored orange for ease of identification, quickly expands to seal off gap to effectively fireblocking requirements in Type V residential construction. This includes the annular space around wires, vents, pipes, ducts, and other mechanical penetrants; as well as common window & door applications such as voids, gaps, cracks, and spaces between window and door jambs / framing.  Its this expansive property that enables one 24 oz. can of Thermal Seal All-In-One Foam Sealant to yield up to the equivalent of 30+ standard caulk tubes. After application, Thermal Seal is tack free in as little as 5 minutes, able to be cut after an hour, and fully cures in 12-24 hours.

An All-In-One Foam Sealants, such as Thermal Seal, help reduce both project timelines and costs.Thermal Seal is designed to provide top-quality performance as efficiently as possible. Installers will find themselves switching out cans less often due to the product’s high yield and All-In-One formulation while retaining cost effectiveness per R unit thanks to Thermal Seal’s increased closed cell content. In addition, it allows the installer to move onto new areas or tasks more quickly due to the quick set-up time – all of which contributes to quicker project turnaround at less cost.

Click to view the Thermal Seal product page.

 

Fireblocking is required by the International Building Code for Type V residential construction.  It is not to be used as a firestop in commercial construction, in any hourly rated assemblies, where a firestop is required, or any application or geographic location where its usage is prohibited by building codes. Always consult with local compliance authorities prior to use. FlameTech FB Fireblocking Foam Sealant is  for professional use only and should be used with the proper training and personal protective equipment. Refer to our technical data sheet & safety data sheet (found on our product page) for further information, or contact us directly.

The post Everkem Announces Launch Of Thermal Seal – All In One Foam Sealant appeared first on .

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